ISMB2001 - The 9th International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, Tivoli Gardens, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 22 - 25, 2001
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SUNDAY, JULY 22 MONDAY, JULY 23 TUESDAY, JULY 24
PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE INITIATIVE
Discussion organized by Michael B. Eisen

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and University of California Berkeley

Sunday, July 23, 17:00 - 17:30 in the Concert Hall

The discussion address the question of whether the record of scientific research should be privately owned and controlled?

We believe that the permanent, archival record of scientific research and ideas should neither be owned nor controlled by publishers, but should belong to the public, and should be made freely available.

We support the establishment of international online public libraries of science that contain the complete text of all published scientific articles in searchable and interlinked formats.


BIOETHICS AND FICTION SCIENCE
Presented by Pierre Baldi

Department of Information and Computer Science and
Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California, Irvine

Monday, July 23, 16:15 - 17:30 in the Concert Hall

At the beginning of the third millennium, mankind for the first time is staring at its genome. Within the same generation, the human brain will also stare at machines that surpass its raw computing power and an interconnected world of information processing devices approaching science fiction. Rapid progress in biological and computer technologies raise profound questions about the nature and boundaries of life, intelligence, and who we really are.

It may be of comfort to some to realize that modern biotechnology is in many ways just a powerful extension of human agricultural and breeding practices. Such practices have been ongoing for thousands of years. Throughout our history, we have manipulated and selected the genomes of plants and animals, and even our own. For most of our past, such control could be exerted only at the macroscopic level of entire organisms. It was crude, slow, and cumbersome. Today we can manipulate genomes directly at the microscopic level, the level of single genes and their constituents. We begin to be able to edit genomes like we do computer programs with a scope, speed, and precision that far exceeds evolution, rendering sexuality cumbersome and obsolete.

This workshop has two distinct themes. One is "fiction science", extrapolating current trends and imagining some of the possible scenarios for the future, regardless of their desirability. The second is bioethics in the context of contemporary issues such as stem cell research, genetic therapies, genetically modified food, human cloning, and gene patents.

Although the issues to be addressed are non-technical, they are no less important or timely. In 1999, stem cells were voted, "breakthrough of the year" in Science. Today, the Human Genome Project is essentially completed and the race for patenting human genes, as well as engineered organisms, is on. Human cloning is within reach and the carbon-silicon boundary has begun to evaporate.

The workshop will provide a brief overview of these issues and a forum for free discussion and speculation. As scientists, we have a duty to explore these questions and share information with the community. If we don't, who will?

Reference: P. Baldi "The Shattered Self. The End of Natural Evolution." MIT Press, (2001).

PUTTING INFORMATICS TO WORK:
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND BUSINESS PROMISES

Presented by Heller Ehrman White & McAuliffe LLP

Dan Appelman, Bruce Jenett, Colin Sandercock, Qin Shi

Tuesday, July 24 from 17:00 - 19:00 in the Concert Hall.
The workshop includes a reception with light food and drinks.

OVERVIEW


Enabling technologies have driven evolvement and maturation of bioinformatics and genomics enterprises. Successful value realization of informatics knowledge products, a pressing goal of genomics and biotech executives and researchers, hinges upon realistic appreciation and hence comprehensive grasp of legal and business instruments operative in the healthcare and pharmaceutical sectors nationally and globally.

This workshop addresses important intellectual property issues and their business implications in the informatics field. Protection and commercialization of informatics innovations is discussed in the context of the legal and business ambient of the U.S., Europe, and other relevant geographical locale. Case studies on the current typical bioinformatics IP portfolios, business models, and collaborative ventures are analyzed.

SESSION DETAILS
  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A GENERAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY STRATEGY
    Dan Appelman, 25 minutes
    1. Selection of Protection Devices Based on Business and Technology Demands
      1. Copyright
      2. Trade Secrecy
      3. Trademark
      4. Patens
    2. Traps of Unwary
      1. Owner of work product
      2. Timing of venture capital procurement
      3. Over-reliance on NDAs
      4. Establishing name recognition before trademark clearance
    3. DOs and DON'Ts

  2. PROTECTION OF INFORMATICS KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTS
    Qin Shi, 25 minutes
    1. Particularities of Informatics Inventions in the Post-Genomics Era
      1. Data Variously Formatted
      2. Comprehensive Tool Sets for Discovery Research
      3. Biology Validations: Back to Bottom Line
    2. Compilation of Suitable Protection Schemes for Informatics Knowledge Products
      1. Aggressive Patenting: What to Claim?
      2. Packaging Informatics Knowledge Products with an Eye toward Downstream Therapeutic And Diagnostic Commodities
      3. Synergistic Value Enhancement by Copyrights, Patents, and Trade Secrets
    3. Global Reconciliation and Harmonization in Informatics IP Policies
      1. Sound IP Strategy Informed by Transnationality of Informatics Research and Business Enterprises
      2. New Rules and Trends in the U.S., Japan, and Europe Concerning Bioinformatics and Genomics

  3. LICENSING IN BIOINFORMATICS: A KEY VEHICLE TO IP VALUE EXPLOITATION
    Colin Sandercock, 25 minutes
    1. Licensing "ABC" and Strategic Leveraging Among Collaborators
    2. A Survey of Typical Licensing Agreements Among Bioinformatics, Genomics Firms and Biotech, Pharmaceutical Companies

  4. ALIGNING FOR SUCCESS: A BUSINESS PERSPECTIVE
    - CORPORATE PARTNERING BETWEEN A PHARMA AND A SMALLCO SPECIALIZED IN BIOINFORMATICS AND GENOMICS

    Bruce Jenett, 25 minutes
    1. Advantages of Corporate Partnering
      1. Advantages to Pharma
      2. Advantages to Smallco
    2. Disadvantages of Corporate Partnering
      1. Disadvantages to Pharma
      2. Disadvantages to Smallco
    3. Key Issues in Corporate Partnering
      1. Pharma Issues
      2. Smallco Issues
      3. Common Issues
    4. Common Types of Corporate Partnering Relationships
      1. Pure Distribution and Licensing Arrangements
      2. Development Funding (Non-Equity) Arrangements
      3. Technology or Product Development Arrangement With Terms Favorable to Pharma
      4. Technology or Product Development Arrangement With Option to Pharma to
      5. Acquire Developed Technology
      6. OEM Arrangement
      7. Technology or Product Development Arrangement With Equity Investment
      8. Straight Equity Investment With No Development Funding
      9. Joint Ventures
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